Inline Speed Skating News

Inline Skating Is Cool Again

If there was a single good thing to come out of the Coronavirus pandemic, it might be the resurgence of inline skating. There have been numerous inline skating articles from respected news sources claiming the comeback of inline roller skating due to the social distancing rules during this pandemic. Many people have had the desire to get outside and enjoy the day, and rolling by themselves or in small groups was a perfect way to do just that.

Below are few of the great articles highlighting the comeback of inline skating. Make sure you check them out and share if possible. Let’s do our part to grow our amazing sport and inline skating in general. Thanks!

John Rushin, Marketing Manager for K2 Skate, says the surge in skate sales during the global pandemic has been massive, but he also attributes it to the revival in 90s culture. The nostalgic appeal of 90s music and style has edged its way back into pop culture in the last few years, and the coronavirus outbreak served as a tipping point for skating. “The 90s are hot again,” he says. “That’s when inline skating really had its heyday. It was only a matter of time for it to come back and we hope we can make it more than a trend or a fad.”

Check out the full article here: Why Roller Skating Has Made A Comeback During The Coronavirus/ – Report Door

 

Inline skating is oddly, ideally suited for this moment. Rollerblading coaxes more effort out of the glutes and the core (pushing, balancing) while demanding less of the joints. You can cruise for an extended period of time and work up a casual sweat, target hills to test resistance, or try a HIIT-reminiscent practice known as “interval blading,” which involves repeats of all-out sprints and rest. The latter might take the exercise out of the cardiovascular zone, but it will further diversify your weekly workouts and give you an understanding of what pace is officially uncomfortable. Word to the wise: when you do try to go faster, get low. Bend the knees and pump the arms.

Check out the full article here: Once Left for Dead, Inline Skates Are Making a Fitness-Driven Comeback – Inside Hook

 

John Rushin, Marketing Manager for K2 Skate, says the surge in skate sales during the global pandemic has been massive, but he also attributes it to the revival in 90s culture. The nostalgic appeal of 90s music and style has edged its way back into pop culture in the last few years, and the coronavirus outbreak served as a tipping point for skating. “The 90s are hot again,” he says. “That’s when inline skating really had its heyday. It was only a matter of time for it to come back and we hope we can make it more than a trend or a fad.”

Check out the full article here: With Skiing Out, Inline Skating is Surging – Powder

 

But the bicycle is timeless — it’s the first machine many of us ever learn to master. Plus, it has adapted to myriad environments and disciplines, from mountain trails to city streets. Inline skates, meanwhile, typically stay on kinder, pedestrian-friendly surfaces. So who’s driving the boot-based boom?

Oddly enough, according to both Hyser and Rushin, the answer may lie in my Colorado backyard.

“It has something to do with the ski/wintersports season being cut short globally,” Rushin told me matter-of-factly. That caught me off guard. As a non-skier (yeah, I know), I didn’t initially make the connection. But inline skates provide an experience far more similar to popular wintersports than a bike.

“We are seeing skiers who can’t ski and hockey players that can’t skate on the ice,” Hyser added. What’s more, he said, many of the initial champions of blading — folks like me who were in their teens and 20s at the turn of the millennium — now have kids old enough to try the sport.

Like handing down dad’s first fishing pole or mom’s old 10-speed, inline skates are passing from one generation to the next. Plus, that gives throwbacks like me the perfect excuse to buy a shiny new pair of skates (and cut the legs off an old pair of Levis).

And it’s all happening just as everyone needs something accessible but challenging, and fun yet safe enough for the current social climate. Accordingly, both Rollerblade and K2 see the sport growing within a broad mix of demographics: youth, adult, male, female, and various socioeconomic classes.

Check out the full article here: Blades Are Back! – Gear Junkie

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